The Acropolis

  • SumoMe

 

After exiting the Acropoli metro and taking the long way around Dionysiou Areopagitou Street I head toward the cafes in Thissio to settle in for a round of writing.

I overhear something. A tiny but fierce-eyed Greek woman is walking with her friend, carrying herbs presumingly picked at the Pnyx Hill. She points up toward the Acropolis and says “I could never imagine waking up and not seeing that.”

I silently agree. There’s an energy about the Acropolis that I am rather certain I could not breathe without. And though I’ve been there more times than I can count; there is always something more to discover.

Ancient graffiti scratched into the marble. Unfinished column drums from the Old Parthenon built into the north wall. The sacred caves, closed off to the public. Inscriptions on a piece of marble settling back into wild flowers. And if you know where to look, there are still faint traces of color; the Ancient Greeks were no stranger to paint.

At the last moment, I turn around and decide to visit my most holy place on Earth.

Propylea, the gateway into the Acropolis

 

Propylea, the gateway into the Acropolis

 

After walking through the Propylea – the monumental gateway to the Acropolis – the eyes of tourist simultaneously shift to the east and meet the Parthenon. Voices in a fabulous diversity of language speak excitedly in respective tones. These are people from all over the planet fulfilling their dream of visiting this ancient monument.

However there are few words in any language that capture the magnificence of the Parthenon. To stand next to the Parthenon is to understand the Parthenon. It is birth, light, and hope built with human’s best intentions. Illuminated brilliance bestows justice to knowledge, creativity and wonder.

The Parthenon

The Parthenon

The Parthenon, fire damage

 

In a time heightened by inspiration, to witness the construction of the Parthenon must have been something. But after earthquakes, fires, destruction and looting, the Parthenon is presently a skeleton of her past. Yet she still stands with dignity on the Acropolis rock, a fantastic 150m (490 ft) above sea level, the crown of Athens. The Parthenon is a symbol to the whole human race: this is our potential.

North side of the Acropolis. The Erechtheion was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon.

North side of the Acropolis. The Erechtheion was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon.

 The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion

 The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion

 The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion

 The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion

 

Scattered stones at the Acropolis

Scattered stones

 

Archaeology at the Acropolis

The guard blows his whistle, it’s time to leave now. I carefully walk down the ancient steps and return to Dionysiou Areopagitou Street. Inspiration has lit a fire in my soul however I’m feeling rather nostalgic.

I could never imagine waking up and not seeing the Acropolis.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: